Porn, Cancer and Microsoft

Man, porn is the media today!

I just got done watching this report on CNN of a pastor in Aus. who lied about having cancer for two years just to cover up his addiction to pornography. (he also has a “hit” worship song that is being pulled from the market – am I the only one who finds it odd that there are “hit” worship songs?) Then, Microsoft announces a new feature in IE8 which will allow people to surf the web in secret, a feature being dubbed “porn mode.”

Isn’t that interesting? On one hand, someone has gone out of his way to hide an addiction to porn and at the very same time a computer company wants to make it easier for people to look at porn online in secret.

I am so sad that this pastor felt that it was “better” to create a fake diagnosis of cancer than to admit that he couldn’t control his own addictive behavior. Once again, we find an example of a ruined life (thank God he is still alive) from this. When are Christians going to do more than just create atmospheres of shame and guilt? I mean, this was not anyone else’s fault for sure…this guy purposefully and willfully hid this and lied about it. But imagine if he were in a place where he could honestly talk about this addiction and get help. Imagine how much hurt could have been saved if that were the case. I’ve seen porn ruin too many lives around me. I’ve seen good friends go to jail, get divorced and worst of all, die. I hold each of them personally accountable for their actions (I mean, just because things that are addictive and potentially harmful are produced doesn’t mean that we have to consume them) but surely there’s a better way for people with any addiction to get help.

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One response to “Porn, Cancer and Microsoft

  1. hippylostintime

    From my personal experience, it’s impossible to be “real” in most religious environments, because we are either (a) always looking to somehow be “better” or “further along” in our spiritual walk, which means we have to have others who are our “prayer concerns,” or (b) we don’t really have faith, so we turn our focus from ourselves and our doubts to the external struggles of others — somehow making ourselves “feel” better. And you’re right — it’s their own choices, their own responsibility. But isn’t “the church” suppose to be different?

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